ASMR – Anal Massage Without Penetration: [Video]

ASMR - Anal Massage Without Penetration

Defined as a “calming, pleasurable feeling often accompanied by a tingling sensation”, ASMR occurs in response to certain stimuli and has also been likened to a ‘head orgasm’. This video shows how it can be used to stimulate the prostate without penetration. 

ASMR – Anal Massage Without Penetration: [Video]

Autonomous sensory meridian response (ASMR), sometimes auto sensory meridian response, is a tingling sensation that typically begins on the scalp and moves down the back of the neck and upper spine. A pleasant form of paresthesia, it has been compared with auditory-tactile synesthesia and may overlap with frisson.

ASMR signifies the subjective experience of “low-grade euphoria” characterized by “a combination of positive feelings and a distinct static-like tingling sensation on the skin”. It is most commonly triggered by specific auditory or visual stimuli, and less commonly by intentional attention control.A genre of videos which intend to stimulate ASMR has emerged, of which over 13 million are published on YouTube.

While many colloquial and formal terms used and proposed between 2007 and 2010 included reference to orgasm, there was during that time a significant majority objection to its use among those active in online discussions, many of whom have continued to persist in differentiating the euphoric and relaxing nature of ASMR from sexual arousal.   However, the argument for sexual arousal persists, and some proponents have published videos categorized as ASMRotica (ASMR erotica), which are deliberately designed to be sexually stimulating. 

Early proponents of ASMR concluded that the phenomenon was generally unrelated to sexual arousal. In 2010, Jennifer Allen, a participant in an online forum, proposed that the phenomenon be named “autonomous sensory meridian response”. Allen chose the words intending or assuming them to have the following specific meanings:

  • Autonomous – spontaneous, self-governing, with or without control
  • Sensory – pertaining to the senses or sensation
  • Meridian – signifying a peak, climax, or point of highest development
  • Response – referring to an experience triggered by something external or internal

Allen verified in a 2016 interview that she purposely selected these terms because they were more objective, comfortable, and clinical than alternative terms for the sensation.  In that interview, Allen explained she selected the word meridian to replace the word orgasm and said she had found a dictionary that defined meridian as “a point or period of highest development, greatest prosperity, or the like”

ASMR Explained by Maria of Gentle Whispering

Sensation

Further information: Paresthesia

The subjective experience, sensation, and perceptual phenomenon of ASMR is described by some of those susceptible to it as “akin to a mild electrical current…or the carbonated bubbles in a glass of champagne.” The tingling sensation on the skin in general, called paresthesia, is referred to by ASMR enthusiasts as “tingles” when experienced along the scalp, neck, and back.  It has been described as, “a static tingling sensation originating from the back of the head, then propagating to the neck, shoulder, arm, spine, and legs, which makes people feel relaxed and alert.”

Variance

Though little scientific research has been conducted into potential neurobiological correlates to the perceptual phenomenon, with a consequent dearth of data with which to explain its physical nature, personal commentary from forums, blogs, and video comments has been analysed to describe the phenomenon. Analysis of this anecdotal evidence has supported the original consensus that ASMR is euphoric but non-sexual in nature, and has divided those who experience ASMR into two broad categories of subjects. One category depends upon external triggers to experience the localized sensation and its associated feelings, which typically originates in the head, often reaching down the neck and sometimes the upper back. The other category can intentionally augment the sensation and feelings through attentional control, without dependence upon external stimuli, or ‘triggers’, in a manner compared by some subjects to their experience of meditation.

Triggers

ASMR is usually precipitated by stimuli referred to as ‘triggers’.  ASMR triggers, which are most commonly auditory and visual, may be encountered through the interpersonal interactions of daily life. Additionally, ASMR is often triggered by exposure to specific audio and video. Such media may be specially made with the specific purpose of triggering ASMR or originally created for other purposes and later discovered to be effective as a trigger of the experience.

Stimuli that can trigger ASMR, as reported by those who experience it, include the following:

  • Listening to a softly spoken or whispering voice
  • Listening to quiet, repetitive sounds resulting from someone engaging in a mundane task such as turning the pages of a book
  • Watching somebody attentively execute a mundane task such as preparing food
  • Loudly chewing, crunching, slurping or biting foods, drinks, or gum
  • Receiving personal attention
  • Initiating the stimulus through conscious manipulation without the need for external video or audio triggers
  • Listening to tapping, typically nails onto surfaces such as plastic, wood, metal, etc.
  • Hand movements, especially onto one’s face
  • Listening to certain types of music
  • Listening to a person blow or exhale into a microphone

A 2017 study of 130 survey respondents found that lower-pitched, complex sounds, and slow-paced, detail-focused videos are especially effective triggers.

Whispering

Psychologists Nick Davis and Emma Barratt discovered that whispering was an effective trigger for 75% of the 475 subjects who took part in an experiment to investigate the nature of ASMR; this statistic is reflected in the popularity of intentional ASMR videos that comprise someone speaking in a whispered voice.

Auditory

Many of those who experience ASMR report that non-vocal ambient noises performed through human action are also effective triggers of ASMR. Examples of such noises include fingers scratching or tapping a surface, brushing hair, hands rubbing together or manipulating fabric, the crushing of eggshells, the crinkling and crumpling of a flexible material such as paper, or writing. Many YouTube videos that are intended to trigger ASMR responses feature a single person performing these actions and the sounds that result.

Gay Sex Sounds – ASMR

Personal attention role play

In addition to the effectiveness of specific auditory stimuli, many subjects report that ASMR is triggered by the receipt of tender personal attention, often comprising combined physical touch and vocal expression, such as when having their hair cut, nails painted, ears cleaned, or back massaged, whilst the service provider speaks quietly to the recipient.

Furthermore, many of those who have experienced ASMR during these and other comparable encounters with a service provider report that watching an “ASMRtist” simulate the provision of such personal attention, acting directly to the camera as if the viewer were the recipient of a simulated service, is sufficient to trigger it.

Psychologists Nick Davis and Emma Barratt discovered that personal attention was an effective trigger for 69% of the 475 subjects who participated in a study conducted at Swansea University, second in popularity only to whispering.

Tactile

In addition to audio and visual stimuli, ASMR may be caused by light touches and brushing against the skin such as effleurage

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